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Dr. Yong Cho - "The Mongol Impact: Why Weave When You Can Paint or Sculpt?"
Due to severe weather and rolling blackouts across Texas, the Katherine Tsanoff Brown Lecture featuring Dr. Yong Cho originally scheduled for February 19th has been moved to Friday, April 9th at 4pm CST. (Those who have already registered for the webinar do not need to register again for the event.)
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The Department of Art History and Department of Transnational Asian Studies cordially invite you to attend the first Katherine Tsanoff Brown Lecture Series of the semester with Dr. Yong Cho, Assistant Professor of the History of Art at University of California, Riverside. Dr. Cho is a specialist in the art and architecture of East and Central Asia from medieval and early modern periods. He focuses on the question of how artistic creativity emerges when people, objects, and ideas move or become displaced from the place of origin.

Apr 9, 2021 04:00 PM in Central Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Yong Cho
Assistant Professor, Department of the History of Art @University of California, Riverside
As a specialist in the art and architecture of East and Central Asia from medieval and early modern periods, Yong Cho focuses on the question of how artistic creativity emerges when people, objects, and ideas move or become displaced from the place of origin. His research interests cover a broad range of topics: theories of cross-cultural contact, multiculturalism and multilingualism in visual arts, the visual and material cultures of mobile societies, sacred objects and their relationship to ritual, the relationship between making and meaning, and the historiography of Silk Road art and archaeology. His current book project, tentatively titled "The Mongol Impact: Rebuilding the Arts System in Yuan China (1271-1368)," investigates a moment of major cultural transformation in the imperial court of China, when the Mongols, the tent-dwelling pastoral nomadic peoples of the North Asian steppe, became rulers of a world empire.